My New York Times debut!

My New York Times debut!

Blessed Unrest's Platonov

"Becca Schneider exhibited adept duality, moving between the lovelorn Sofya and the outlaw Osip with ease. Schneider was able to truly embody two dueling personalities of Chekhov, a capable woman stricken by love...and the raunchy, unapologetically fringe Osip."  —Elizabeth Glasure, Stage Biz

"Someone invented 'aplomb' to describe the marked intelligence with which Becca Schneider took turns as Sofya, Sergei’s wife, and Osip, a gun-toting lowlife."  —John Osburn, Osburnt

"The ten characters are vividly played by a cast of six who marvelously double in some roles of the opposite gender...Becca Schneider is…formidable as a male rifle-toting outlaw and as a Sergei’s volatile wife Sofya."  —Darryl Reilly, Theatrescene.net

"Performances are excellent, especially from...Becca Schneider...[who is] double-cast and play[s] across the gender spectrum."  —Carrie Lee O'Dell, The Reviews Hub

"[In] this crisply directed production...the entire cast does magnificent work.” Leah Richards, Culture Catch

Sharon Playhouse's The Music Man

"Becca Schneider stood out as Constable Alma Hix."  —Naugatuck Patch

"[Morgan Green's] cast members seem to bounce around...gaining energy with each leap while never losing the stamina to keep songs on pitch and dance moves in step...[The cast] is filled with talented individuals who each bring nuance and imagination to their roles."  —CB Wismar, The Berkshire Edge

Doppelskope's Gruff! the Musical

"Becca Schneider steals the show with her aged villain Mavis, who waddles across the stage behind a walker."  —Ran Xia, Theatre Is Easy

Blessed Unrest's A Christmas Carol

"A humanizing warmth flickers through this stripped-down, six-actor 'A Christmas Carol.'"  —The New York Times

"With the command and swagger of a Shakespearean heroine, Becca Schneider winningly plays Scrooge's nephew Fred, Scrooge's doomed sister Fan, and a barkeep. Ms. Schneider is also a quirky and affecting Tiny Tim, hobbling around on that fabled crutch."  —Darryl Reilly, Theatrescene.net

"Becca Schneider...as Scrooge's nephew Fred, stays on pitch singing "All I Want for Christmas is You" live...something Mariah Carey doesn't always succeed with."  —NY Theatre Guide

"Rousingly acted by a lively cast...Becca Schneider sets the exaggerated Victorian tone with a vivid portrayal of Scrooge's indomitable nephew Fred, cartoonishly positive-thinking when trying to invite the miser to Christmas dinner, but later revealing a knowing, realistic side."  —Jon Sobel, Blogcritics.org

"Elements of the performance...shine - Becca Schneider [is] particularly charming in all [of her] roles."  —Theatre Is Easy

"[The] superb and enthusiastic ensemble cast members assume more than 30 roles, fluidly and effortlessly, moving from one role to another. The actors deliver raw, physical, and often athletic performances."  —ZEALnyc.com

"A superbly talented ensemble...using their talents to bring numerous characters to life...they exert themselves to make this show happen (literally - there is a lot of running going on), and their efforts are duly noted.  —Kristen Morale, BroadwayWorld

Craig Hanson Photography

What Dreams May Co.'s King Lear

“[As] Goneril, Becca Schneider deftly avoid[s] the trappings of [a] melodrama villain and instead fight[s] desperately - and viciously - to hold onto what little ground [she] possess[es]. If we weren't siding with our titular character, we might forget [she is] the antagonist of the piece."  —Zelda Knapp, A Work Unfinishing

Between Two Boroughs' Summertime

“The cast is well-assembled and full of energy...Becca Schneider brings a focused whimsy and desperation to Tessa."  —Cory Conley, NY Theatre Now

Theatre Outlet's Psycho Beach Party

“Becca Schneider's portrayal of the genius/nerd Berdine is a marvel of comic timing. She can make an audience laugh with just a smirk, a raised eyelid or a bleary, wide-eyed look."  —The Morning Call

J.C. Lee's The Nature Line

“Dora, played with an engaging style by Becca Schneider...deliver[s] a routine right out of vaudeville."  —The Morning Call